International Space Station orbit changed

Nov 10, 2005
International Space Station (ISS)

The crew aboard the International Space Station has successfully completed an orbit correction, raising it by slightly less than five miles.

The maneuver, supervised by NASA, was the first after a failed attempt Oct. 19 when it was planned to lift it by six miles. The engines were then supposed to work for about 25 minutes during two stages. However, they disconnected after 78 seconds, Russia's Novosti news agency reported.

The current ISS crew consists of Russian Valery Tokarev and American William McArthur.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: NASA Webb's heart survives deep freeze test

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

NASA Webb's heart survives deep freeze test

6 hours ago

After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) and its sensitive instruments, ...

Cosmic rays threaten future deep-space astronaut missions

11 hours ago

Crewed missions to Mars remain an essential goal for NASA, but scientists are only now beginning to understand and characterize the radiation hazards that could make such ventures risky, concludes a new paper ...

Big black holes can block new stars

13 hours ago

Massive black holes spewing out radio-frequency-emitting particles at near-light speed can block formation of new stars in aging galaxies, a study has found.

MAVEN studies passing comet and its effects

13 hours ago

NASA's newest orbiter at Mars, MAVEN, took precautions to avoid harm from a dust-spewing comet that flew near Mars today and is studying the flyby's effects on the Red Planet's atmosphere.

User comments : 0