DNA samples used more for property crimes

Oct 20, 2006

Law enforcement agencies across the United States more and more use a national database of criminals' DNA to solve non-violent property crimes.

The database, designed by the FBI to help solve violent crimes such as rape and murder, is more accessible to property crime searches, USA Today said, for several reasons: more sophisticated DNA testing and greater access federal money for testing DNA from property crimes.

In the survey, 10 states reported the number of DNA matches in property cases was greater than the number of matches in violent crime, USA Today said. Several states also collect DNA samples from people convicted of misdemeanor offenses such as minor assaults.

The FBI said the database has DNA profiles from about 3.5 million people, recording matches in about 38,000 cases, the newspaper said. About 25,000 profiles are added to the database a month.

Supporters of the expanded use of DNA testing said people who commit property crime offenses often are later involved in more serious crimes, USA Today said. Opponents said the expansion could raise privacy issues.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Can science eliminate extreme poverty?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

JILA's short, flexible, reusable AFM probe

Apr 09, 2014

(Phys.org) —JILA researchers have engineered a short, flexible, reusable probe for the atomic force microscope (AFM) that enables state-of-the-art precision and stability in picoscale force measurements. ...

Math modeling integral to synthetic biology research

Apr 04, 2014

A long-standing challenge in synthetic biology has been to create gene circuits that behave in predictable and robust ways. Mathematical modeling experts from the University of Houston (UH) collaborated with experimental ...

The promise and peril of nanotechnology

Mar 26, 2014

Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to detect metastatic breast cancer by arranging strands of DNA into spherical shapes and using them to cover a tiny particle of gold, creating a "nano-flare" ...

Recommended for you

Study finds law dramatically curbing need for speed

Apr 18, 2014

Almost seven years have passed since Ontario's street-racing legislation hit the books and, according to one Western researcher, it has succeeded in putting the brakes on the number of convictions and, more importantly, injuries ...

Newlyweds, be careful what you wish for

Apr 17, 2014

A statistical analysis of the gift "fulfillments" at several hundred online wedding gift registries suggests that wedding guests are caught between a rock and a hard place when it comes to buying an appropriate gift for the ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Clippers and coiners in 16th-century England

In 2017 a new £1 coin will appear in our pockets with a design extremely difficult to forge. In the mid-16th century, Elizabeth I's government came up with a series of measures to deter "divers evil persons" ...

Airbnb rental site raises $450 mn

Online lodging listings website Airbnb inked a $450 million funding deal with investors led by TPG, a source close to the matter said Friday.

Health care site flagged in Heartbleed review

People with accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama's signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government's vulnerability to the ...