Study indicates a few extra pounds good

Oct 20, 2006

Scientists in Denmark said research indicates being slightly overweight may help people survive several life-threatening conditions.

The study, based on 13,000 patients, showed that the survival rate of blood clots, heart disease and brain hemorrhages increased proportionally with the body mass index up to a point, the Copenhagen Post said Friday. Body mass index is a body fat measure based on an adult male or female's height and weight.

When a person has a BMI of 35, indicating obesity, doctors said the advantage ceases to exist, the Post said.

Scientists involved in the study could not explain why being slightly overweight increases survival rate, the Post said.

The International Association for the Study of Obesity, cautioned people about reading too much into the Danish study. The study is important, the association said, but "being overweight increases your chances of becoming ill," the newspaper said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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