Study: Vacations are good for women

Nov 10, 2005

Marshfield, Wis., scientists say women who take vacations frequently are more satisfied with their marriages and suffer fewer mental illnesses.

A study conducted by researchers at the Marshfield Clinic System -- one of the largest comprehensive medical systems in the United States -- found the odds of depression and tension were higher among women who took vacations only once in two years, compared with women who took vacations twice or more each year.

In addition, researchers found the odds of marital satisfaction decreased as the frequency of vacations decreased.

"The findings are not surprising," said Cathy McCarty, the study's principal investigator. "Vacations provide a break from everyday stressors. They allow us time away from work or home and help us release built-up tension.

"This study proves vacations are good for your mental health and may help you do a better job at work," she added. "Employers should be supportive of time off because they benefit from having relaxed, happy employees."

The study, funded by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, appeared in a recent issue of the Wisconsin Medical Journal,

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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