NASA holds module naming competition

Oct 18, 2006

NASA is asking U.S. students in kindergarten through 12th grade to help name the next U.S. International Space Station module.

NASA's Node 2 is scheduled to be launched late next year and students attending U.S. schools, as well as children of U.S. personnel overseas, are being asked to help NASA name the module.

The node will be a connecting port and passageway to additional international science labs and space supply vehicles.

NASA's "Name the International Space Station Node 2 Challenge" requires students to work together as a class or school to create their own Node 2 model. Students will name their node, write a brief description explaining the choice, and take digital pictures to send to NASA.

The submitted image of the model will not be judged, but it will be the ticket to enter the name challenge. Submissions will be reviewed by NASA scientists, engineers and educators.

The competition deadline is Dec. 1, with the winning entry to be announced early next year. To register a school or class, teachers or administrators should send an email to: NASA-ESC_at_nasa.gov. Additional information is available at:
esc.nasa.gov

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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