Monolith perhaps largest found in Mexico

Oct 17, 2006
Monolith perhaps largest found in Mexico (AP)
A part of a newly discovered monolith is shown at the archaeological site of Templo Mayor, Mexico City Friday, Oct. 13, 2006, in Mexico City. Archaeologists announced Friday that a monolith discovered Oct. 2 near Mexico City's main square is perhaps the largest ever found in the city's center. The newest discovery is rectangular and measures nearly 4 meters (13 feet) on its longest side. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias)

(AP) -- Archaeologists announced Friday that a monolith discovered earlier this month near Mexico City's main square is perhaps the largest ever unearthed in the city's center.



Content from The Associated Press expires 15 days after original publication date. For more information about The Associated Press, please visit www.ap.org .

Explore further: Short-necked Triassic marine reptile discovered in China

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Microbiome may have shaped early human populations

5 hours ago

We humans have an exceptional age structure compared to other animals: Our children remain dependent on their parents for an unusually long period and our elderly live an extremely long time after they have ...

Big-data analysis reveals gene sharing in mice

5 hours ago

Rice University scientists have detected at least three instances of cross-species mating that likely influenced the evolutionary paths of "old world" mice, two in recent times and one in the distant past.

Recommended for you

Short-necked Triassic marine reptile discovered in China

14 hours ago

A new species of short-necked marine reptile from the Triassic period has been discovered in China, according to a study published December 17, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Xiao-hong Chen f ...

Gothic cathedrals blend iron and stone

21 hours ago

Using radiocarbon dating on metal found in Gothic cathedrals, an interdisciplinary team has shown, for the first time through absolute dating, that iron was used to reinforce stone from the construction phase. ...

Research shows Jaws didn't kill his cousin

Dec 16, 2014

New research suggests our jawed ancestors weren't responsible for the demise of their jawless cousins as had been assumed. Instead Dr Robert Sansom from The University of Manchester believes rising sea levels ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.