Monolith perhaps largest found in Mexico

Oct 17, 2006
Monolith perhaps largest found in Mexico (AP)
A part of a newly discovered monolith is shown at the archaeological site of Templo Mayor, Mexico City Friday, Oct. 13, 2006, in Mexico City. Archaeologists announced Friday that a monolith discovered Oct. 2 near Mexico City's main square is perhaps the largest ever found in the city's center. The newest discovery is rectangular and measures nearly 4 meters (13 feet) on its longest side. (AP Photo/Guillermo Arias)

(AP) -- Archaeologists announced Friday that a monolith discovered earlier this month near Mexico City's main square is perhaps the largest ever unearthed in the city's center.



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