FDA approves skin cancer drug

Oct 13, 2006

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved a new drug to treat a rare, slow-growing skin cancer.

The FDA approved Zolinza capsules for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphomalymphoma, a lymphoma that affects the skin. The FDA, in a news release, said the drug was approved to use when the disease worsens, is persistent or returns after treatment with other drugs.

About 3 in 1 million people, mainly middle-aged men, are diagnosed with CTCL each year, the FDA said.

The FDA said it approved Zolinza as part of its Orphan Drug program, which offers companies financial incentives to develop medicines for diseases and conditions affecting fewer than 200,000 people in the United States a year.

Zolinza is manufactured by Pantheon Inc. for Merck & Co. Inc., the FDA said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Evidence lacking for long-term opioid use in low back pain

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Engineered salmon may be a tough sell

Apr 03, 2014

The Obama administration has stalled for more than four years on deciding whether to approve a fast-growing salmon that would be the first genetically modified animal approved for human consumption.

New high-tech glasses detect cancer cells during surgery

Mar 10, 2014

A team of scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL) and the University of Arizona (UA) in Tucson led by Samuel Achilefu have created a pair of high-tech glasses that help ...

Recommended for you

Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines

4 hours ago

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive ...

Drug watchdog urges vigilance in cancer drug theft

8 hours ago

Europe's medicine watchdog urged doctors Thursday to be vigilant in administering the cancer drug Herceptin, vials of which had been stolen in Italy and tampered with before being sold back into the supply chain.

Pyridoxine-doxylamine drug safety data lacking

Apr 16, 2014

(Medical Xpress)—The most commonly prescribed drug for pregnant women suffering from morning sickness in their first trimester does not prevent birth defects even though drug safety data says it does, according to research ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...

Researchers discover target for treating dengue fever

Two recent papers by a University of Colorado School of Medicine researcher and colleagues may help scientists develop treatments or vaccines for Dengue fever, West Nile virus, Yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis and other ...

Our brains are hardwired for language

A groundbreaking study published in PLOS ONE by Prof. Iris Berent of Northeastern University and researchers at Harvard Medical School shows the brains of individual speakers are sensitive to language univer ...

Study recalculates costs of combination vaccines

One of the most popular vaccine brands for children may not be the most cost-effective choice. And doctors may be overlooking some cost factors when choosing vaccines, driving the market toward what is actually a more expensive ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...