Meeting to focus on infectious diseases

Oct 11, 2006

More than 4,000 people are expected in Toronto for the first meeting of the Infectious Diseases Society of America outside the United States.

The society's 44th annual meeting will be Thursday-Sunday at the Metro Toronto Convention Center.

The society's physician and research scientists will have the opportunity to attend sessions that will cover topics such as new vaccines, practice guidelines, and electronic tools for infectious disease identification. Attendees will also hear latest research developments for infective endocarditis, Clostridium difficile, Staphylococcus aureus, acute HIV, sexually transmitted diseases, pandemic influenza and more.

Major programs of IDSA include publication of two journals, The Journal of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Infectious Diseases. The Society, which has about 8,000 members worldwide, was founded in 1963 and has headquarters in Alexandria, Va.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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