Lake Okeechobee at risk in hurricanes

Oct 10, 2006

Scientists say New Orleans is most vulnerable to hurricane storm surge-caused loss of life and property damage of all U.S. East Coast and Gulf Coast areas.

Using a formula based on storm intensity, flooding potential, population, evacuation routes and other factors, the coastal scientists at Florida International University in Miami told The New York Times the second most vulnerable area is Lake Okeechobee, Fla., where, in 1928, approximately 2,500 people died when a hurricane whipped the lake's water into a powerful surge.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers rebuilt the lake's dike after that storm. The dike is 140 miles long, 45 feet high in places and up to 150 feet wide at its base, but some scientists told The Times it does not meet modern dam criteria and might not survive another hurricane. If it's breached, the lives of 40,000 people would be threatened, they said.

The storm surge analysis is to be reported in The Journal of Coastal Research.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Fall in monsoon rains driven by rise in air pollution, study shows

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tropical Storm Rachel dwarfed by developing system 90E

21 hours ago

Tropical Storm Rachel is spinning down west of Mexico's Baja California, and another tropical low pressure area developing off the coast of southwestern Mexico dwarfs the tropical storm. NOAA's GOES-West ...

Image: A cosmic hurricane

Sep 23, 2014

The giant planet Saturn is mostly a gigantic ball of rotating gas, completely unlike our solid home planet. But Earth and Saturn do have something in common: weather, although the gas giant is home to some ...

Five facts about NASA's ISS-RapidScat

Sep 19, 2014

NASA's ISS-RapidScat mission will observe ocean wind speed and direction over most of the globe, bringing a new eye on tropical storms, hurricanes and typhoons. Here are five fast facts about the mission.

NASA sees Hurricane Edouard enter cooler waters

Sep 18, 2014

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite and Aqua satellite gathered data on Hurricane Edouard's rainfall, clouds and waning power is it continued moving northward in the Atlantic into ...

Recommended for you

Sculpting tropical peaks

3 hours ago

Tropical mountain ranges erode quickly, as heavy year-round rains feed raging rivers and trigger huge, fast-moving landslides. Rapid erosion produces rugged terrain, with steep rivers running through deep ...

Volcano expert comments on Japan eruption

4 hours ago

Loÿc Vanderkluysen, PhD, who recently joined Drexel as an assistant professor in Department of Biodiversity, Earth and Environmental Science in the College of Arts and Sciences, returned Friday from fieldwork ...

NASA's HS3 looks Hurricane Edouard in the eye

17 hours ago

NASA and NOAA scientists participating in NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storms Sentinel (HS3) mission used their expert skills, combined with a bit of serendipity on Sept. 17, 2014, to guide the remotely piloted ...

User comments : 0