Study: Sperm banks unpopular with patients

Oct 05, 2006

Canadian researchers say they found sperm banks are unpopular, even with cancer patients facing treatments that might make them infertile.

The study led by McGill University Health Center researcher Dr. Peter Chan highlights the need to improve doctor-patient communication about the benefits of sperm banking and the need for accurate and personalized information about the high risk of infertility associated with treatment for testicular cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma.

Testicular cancer and Hodgkin's lymphoma are among the most common malignancies to affect young men of reproductive age. "Testicular cancer accounts for over 25 percent of all cancers diagnosed in men aged 20-24 years, and Hodgkin's lymphoma accounts for about 15 percent in the same age group," said Chan, director of male reproductive medicine at the McGill and senior author of the study. "Sperm banking is the best hope for cancer patients that may wish to father children in the future."

The research is discussed in a recent issue of the journal Human Reproduction.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: First vital step in fertilization between sperm and egg discovered

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