Few doctors using e-mail

Oct 04, 2006

A study by the Center for Studying Health System Change, in Washington has said fewer than 25 percent of doctors use e-mail to communicate with patients.

The study by the nonprofit healthcare think tank said doctors fear they won't be properly reimbursed for their time if they communicate by e-mail and they fear becoming overloaded with correspondence sent via the Internet, the Rocky Mountain News reported Wednesday.

Researcher Allison Liebhaber said some health plans have begun testing payment plans for e-mail interactions but "reimbursement remains limited and that's likely a major barrier to physician adoption."

"From a physician's perspective, we are taught that in order to get a proper gauge of the problem you have to take a history, and you can't do that over e-mail," said Dr. Jay Krakovitz, heath insurer Anthem's Colorado medical director. "Physicians also feel that the time it takes to do this doesn't get reimbursed enough."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Key element of CPR missing from guidelines

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

This is why some urban legends go viral

Jun 30, 2014

Urban legends get around, but we don't really understand why. We conducted a study to explain how misinformation spreads surprisingly fast and why people feel compelled to share it.

Google resumes Glass sales in the US

May 14, 2014

Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine-tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact ...

Recommended for you

Key element of CPR missing from guidelines

14 hours ago

Removing the head tilt/chin lift component of rescue breaths from the latest cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) guidelines could be a mistake, according to Queen's University professor Anthony Ho.

Burnout impacts transplant surgeons (w/ Video)

Jul 28, 2014

Despite saving thousands of lives yearly, nearly half of organ transplant surgeons report a low sense of personal accomplishment and 40% feel emotionally exhausted, according to a new national study on transplant surgeon ...

User comments : 0