Anti-smoking ads credited for cancer drop

Oct 04, 2006

An American Cancer Society study has credited anti-smoking campaigns with reducing the number of annual cancer deaths in the United States.

The Atlanta-based society said in the study, published in the October issue of Tobacco Control, that if smoking rates had not declined in the past 50 years, there would be no drop in cancer rates, USA Today reported Wednesday.

The study said cancer rates dropped 16 percent for men between 1991 and 2003, declining from 279 deaths per 100,000 to 234 per 100,000. Researchers estimated decreases in smoking rates among men are responsible for about 40 percent of the decline.

However, no decline has been recorded in women. The researchers say that is because smoking rates for women began their decline more recently than among men. The death rate for lung cancer among women rose nearly 10 percent from 1991 to 2003.

Michael Thun, a co-author of the report, said overall cancer rates may drop in the next few years due to millions of young people who never started smoking because of the anti-smoking campaigns.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Gene marker may predict breast cancer response to tamoxifen

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Poll: Big Bang a big question for most Americans

Apr 21, 2014

Few Americans question that smoking causes cancer. But they have more skepticism than confidence in global warming, the age of the Earth and evolution and have the most trouble believing a Big Bang created the universe 13.8 ...

Guns aren't the only things killing cops

Apr 11, 2014

The public does not realize—in fact, police themselves may not realize—that the dangers police officers are exposed to on a daily basis are far worse than anything on "Law and Order."

Right, left, wrong: People reject science because ...

Oct 03, 2013

You'd be forgiven for thinking science is under attack. Climate science has been challenged by deniers and sceptics, vaccination rates are falling thanks to anti-vaccination movements, and GM crops are pillaged ...

Scientist takes first step to measure chromium contamination

Apr 29, 2013

Judy Zelikoff is filling an unwanted role. Three decades after hexavalent chromium spread under a Garfield, N.J., neighborhood, this accomplished scientist and her team of researchers at New York University may finally be ...

Recommended for you

Pain and itch may be signs of skin cancer

1 hour ago

Asking patients if a suspicious skin lesion is painful or itchy may help doctors decide whether the spot is likely to be cancerous, according to a new study headed by Gil Yosipovitch, MD, Chairman of the Department of Dermatology ...

Genetics of cancer: Non-coding DNA can finally be decoded

5 hours ago

Cancer is a disease of the genome resulting from a combination of genetic modifications (or mutations). We inherit from our parents strong or weak predispositions to developing certain kinds of cancer; in addition, we also ...

User comments : 0