Firm field tests micro-power broadband

Nov 04, 2005

A Florida company has successfully completed the first field tests of xMax, a long-range signal technique that uses extremely low amounts of power.

xG Technology said Friday it used a simple VHF paging channel to deliver data more than a mile at ground level and delivered a major blow to common wisdom that much higher power levels are required for WiFi performance.

"Demonstrating that broadband wireless communications can occur at such micro-power levels in the presence of interfering signals overturns long-held industry ideas," said xG President Joe Bobier. "What is really exciting is that xMax's unique signal profile is a perfect fit for low frequency channels that have been previously unsuitable for wireless broadband."

xG said in a news release that standard 802.11 WiFi hot spots require 1 watt of power while its xMax functions on .0005 watts, allowing it to operate on low frequencies currently unusable for WiFi.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Facebook 'newspaper' spells trouble for media

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

'Green Revolution' changes breathing of the biosphere

Nov 19, 2014

The intense farming practices of the "Green Revolution" are powerful enough to alter Earth's atmosphere at an ever-increasing rate, boosting the seasonal amplitude in atmospheric carbon dioxide to about 15 ...

Recommended for you

Robots take over inspection of ballast tanks on ships

14 minutes ago

A new robot for inspecting ballast water tanks on board ships is being developed by a Dutch-German partnership including the University of Twente. The robot is able to move independently along rails built ...

Does bad behavior really hurt business?

3 hours ago

Silicon Valley seems to have more than its share of companies behaving badly. Among up-and-comers in the tech world, privacy abuses and executive gaffes have become viral sensations. But is all that bad behavior ...

Advanced cyberspying tool dates from 2008

3 hours ago

A highly sophisticated cyberspying tool has been used since 2008 to steal information from governments, businesses and others, security researchers said Monday.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.