NASA seeks $5 billion more for shuttles

Nov 04, 2005
NASA Administrator Michael Griffin speaks to the press

NASA needs about $5 billion more than previously budgeted to operate the space shuttle before the program ends in 2010, said the agency's director.

Michael D. Griffin, the agency administrator, testifying Thursday before the House Science Committee, said the cost of operating the shuttle fleet before it is scheduled to retire in five years was higher than expected, The New York Times reported Friday.

Griffin said "painful choices" might be needed if the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is to fulfill President George W. Bush's plan to send people back to the moon before 2020.

NASA has planned cutting half its planned space station research, reducing a program to develop nuclear power for space applications and delaying space astronomy missions.

Griffin said agency engineers are confident that they now understand why large pieces of insulating foam fell from the shuttle's external fuel tank during last summer's mission and that they believe they can prevent a recurrence.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Greenland darkening to continue, predicts CCNY expert Marco Tedesco

Related Stories

Solar Orbiter launch delayed to 2018

Apr 14, 2015

The launch of Solar Orbiter, an ESA mission to explore the Sun in unprecedented detail, is now planned to take place in October 2018. The launch was previously targeted for July 2017.

Recommended for you

Ceres' bright spots come back into view

1 hour ago

The two brightest spots on dwarf planet Ceres, which have fascinated scientists for months, are back in view in the newest images from NASA's Dawn spacecraft. Dawn took these images on April 14 and 15 from ...

Vesta—Ceres' little sister

2 hours ago

Only around 60 million kilometres closer to the Sun than Ceres, another large rock is orbiting in the remote asteroid belt: Vesta. Although its diameter of approximately 530 kilometres makes it a bit too ...

Black hole hunters tackle a cosmic conundrum

17 hours ago

Dartmouth astrophysicists and their colleagues have not only proven that a supermassive black hole exists in a place where it isn't supposed to be, but in doing so have opened a new door to what things were ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.