Sharp Triple Directional Viewing LCD Offers Simultaneous Display of 3 Images

Sep 27, 2006
Sharp Triple Directional Viewing LCD Offers Simultaneous Display of 3 Images

Sharp Corporation have developed the Triple Directional Viewing LCD, a display that controls the viewing angle so that the display can show different images from the left, right, and center simultaneously.

Last year, the company developed two world-first products for controlled viewing angle: the two-way viewing-angle LCD and the switchable viewing-angle LCD. Already in use in products like car navigation systems and mobile phones, these displays have allowed Sharp to create new demand and contribute to the creation of new lifestyles.

Sharp Triple Directional Viewing LCD takes this controlled viewing-angle technology a step further. Using a proprietary parallax barrier on a standard TFT LCD, the screen splits light in three directions—left, right, and center—and displays three separate images on the same screen at the same time.

Imagine, for example, people taking a drive in a van. The driver uses a car navigation system screen, the person in the passenger seat checks out tourist sites and restaurants, and the person in the back seat enjoys a movie on DVD, all in full-screen view. It’s truly one LCD that plays three roles at once.

Sharp Triple Directional Viewing LCD is also ideal for multipurpose signs in public: it could display three different ads for stores or restaurants, each aimed at people walking in a certain direction.

Source: Sharp

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maxmc
not rated yet Jan 30, 2009
Am i the only one here who has the words "3D VIDEO" screaming at me?

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