Anti-aging hormone actions revealed

Nov 03, 2005

Scientists say the recently discovered anti-aging hormone "Klotho" acts by increasing a cell's ability to detoxify harmful reactive oxygen species.

The klotho gene -- named after the Greek goddess who spins life's thread -- is associated with preventing aging in mammals. The klotho gene product, the Klotho protein, is secreted in the blood and functions as an anti-aging hormone.

A defect in the klotho gene in mice leads to a syndrome closely resembling human aging, while over-expression of the gene extends lifespan in mice.

Now Makoto Kuro-o, assistant professor of pathology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, has discovered one way in which Klotho extends lifespan. Using cultured cells and transgenic mice, the researcher showed Klotho increases resistance to oxidative stress.

"Increased longevity is always associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress," said Kuro-o. "Oxidative stress causes the accumulation of oxidative damage to important biological macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins that would result in functional deterioration of the cell, which eventually causes aging."

The research appears as the "Paper of the Week" in the Nov. 11 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Congressional rift over environment influences public

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Congressional rift over environment influences public

1 hour ago

American citizens are increasingly divided over the issue of environmental protection and seem to be taking their cue primarily from Congress, finds new research led by a Michigan State University scholar.

Rural loss and ruin can be avoided

4 hours ago

An Australian Reconstruction Development Board needs to be established to help avoid more needless forcing of Australian farmers from their land, a QUT economist has said.

Fragment of Ice Age ivory lion gets its head back

5 hours ago

Archaeologists from the University of Tübingen have found an ancient fragment of ivory belonging to a 40,000 year old animal figurine. Both pieces were found in the Vogelherd Cave in southwestern Germany, ...

User comments : 0