Anti-aging hormone actions revealed

Nov 03, 2005

Scientists say the recently discovered anti-aging hormone "Klotho" acts by increasing a cell's ability to detoxify harmful reactive oxygen species.

The klotho gene -- named after the Greek goddess who spins life's thread -- is associated with preventing aging in mammals. The klotho gene product, the Klotho protein, is secreted in the blood and functions as an anti-aging hormone.

A defect in the klotho gene in mice leads to a syndrome closely resembling human aging, while over-expression of the gene extends lifespan in mice.

Now Makoto Kuro-o, assistant professor of pathology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, has discovered one way in which Klotho extends lifespan. Using cultured cells and transgenic mice, the researcher showed Klotho increases resistance to oxidative stress.

"Increased longevity is always associated with increased resistance to oxidative stress," said Kuro-o. "Oxidative stress causes the accumulation of oxidative damage to important biological macromolecules, such as DNA, lipids, and proteins that would result in functional deterioration of the cell, which eventually causes aging."

The research appears as the "Paper of the Week" in the Nov. 11 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: The 2011 English summer riots: Courts accused of 'collective hysteria'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Combating bullying in New Zealand

20 minutes ago

Victoria University of Wellington's Accent Learning is rolling out a new bullying prevention programme for schools—a first for the Southern Hemisphere.

Why has Halloween infiltrated Australian culture?

2 hours ago

Halloween appears to have infiltrated Australian culture, and according to a University of Adelaide researcher, the reason for its increasing popularity could run much deeper than Americanisation.

The hidden world of labor trafficking

2 hours ago

When it comes to human trafficking, we often hear about victims being kidnapped or violently taken from their homes. But what about people who are forced into labor in the U.S.?

US state reaches deal to keep dinosaur mummy

18 hours ago

North Dakota reached a $3 million deal to keep a rare fossil of a duckbilled dinosaur on display at the state's heritage center, where it will serve as a cornerstone for the facility's $51 million expansion, officials said ...

User comments : 0