Intel Opens Leading-Edge 65nm, 300mm High-Volume Wafer Manufacturing Facility In Arizona

Nov 02, 2005

Intel Corporation has re-opened an advanced, high-volume semiconductor manufacturing facility in Chandler, Ariz., converting it to a leading-edge 300mm, 65nm process factory. Called Fab 12, the factory is Intel’s second volume-production fab using 65nm process technology produced on the industry’s largest wafer size (300mm), which provides the Intel fab with the potential to generate the world’s highest microprocessor output at the lowest cost.

It is also the most technologically advanced, high-volume semiconductor manufacturing plant in the world building multi-core microprocessors.

“The re-opening of Fab 12 marks a first for Intel and the semiconductor industry,” said Bob Baker, senior vice president, general manger, Intel Technology and Manufacturing Group. “The conversion of an existing factory to leading-edge technology – both larger wafer size and most advanced semiconductor technology – further adds to ’s manufacturing capability and improves our ability to better serve our customers.”

The Fab 12 conversion project, which began in 2004 and cost roughly $2 billion, was completed in approximately 18 months. Fab 12 is Intel’s fifth fab using 300mm wafers.

Intel has the largest network of advanced 300mm wafer fabs in the industry. Intel’s other facilities that manufacture using 300mm wafers are Fab 11X in New Mexico, D1D and D1C in Oregon, and Fab 24 in Ireland.

Fab 12’s re-opening is the latest in a string of six Intel announcements regarding re-investment in its U.S. manufacturing sites. In total, the announcements made in 2005 reflect a combination of more than $4 billion of new U.S.-based manufacturing expansion announced this year and completion of this $2 billion investment announced in 2004. These investments will add over 2,000 jobs.

Source: Intel

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