MP3 players seen as hot Christmas gift

Nov 02, 2005

MP3 players will be one of the hottest Christmas gifts this year, a survey found Wednesday.

In its annual consumer survey guide, the Macerich Company found that electronics will be one of the most popular gifts, making up 12 percent of the overall seasonal gift market, with digital music players topping the list of electronic goods.

The iPod Nano is expected to be the most popular gift of them all, followed by Microsoft's Xbox 360 video consoles, while plasma television screens are expected to follow suit.

"A mainstay on holiday shopping lists, the latest electronic products offer a variety of options for shoppers," Garry Butcher, vice president of marketing, said in a news release.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Discover to have Apple Pay available for US cardholders

Related Stories

New material set to change cooling industry

Apr 11, 2015

Refrigeration and air conditioning may become more efficient and environmentally friendly thanks to the patent-pending work of LSU physicists. The team of researchers led by LSU Physics Professor Shane Stadler ...

More deals ahead? China fund buys Silicon Valley chip maker

Apr 08, 2015

China's aggressive new policy to expand its semiconductor industry is worrying U.S. chipmakers, many of which are based in Silicon Valley, and raising potential national security concerns as it begins to acquire U.S. tech ...

Recommended for you

Taking the hassle out of parking

8 minutes ago

It's a pain we all know: trying finding a parking spot in a crowded lot, from shopping centers to medical complexes to the airport. A Rice University team of senior electrical and computer engineers designed ...

Human brain inspires computer memory

9 minutes ago

How is it possible to create computer memory that is both faster and consumes less energy? Researchers at the Institut d'électronique fondamentale (CNRS/Université Paris-Sud) and CEA-List have unlocked ...

A Google for handwriting

14 minutes ago

To be able to use computers to analyse and search handwritten texts would revolutionise research in the humanities. And the technology to digitise printed books and make them searchable already exists.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.