Unusual meteorite found in Antarctica

Sep 19, 2006

U.S. scientists say they recovered an unusual meteorite late last year in Antarctica -- a type of lunar meteorite seen only once before.

The specimen was found by a field party from the U.S. Antarctic Search for Meteorites program -- ANSMET -- which has headquarters at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.

The meteorite was discovered last December on an ice field in the Transantarctic Mountains, about 470 miles from the South Pole. The black rock, slightly larger than a golf ball and officially designated MIL 05035, was one of 238 meteorites collected by ANSMET during the 2005-06 austral summer.

Scientists involved in classification of Antarctic finds at NASA's Johnson Space Center and the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History say the meteorite is a piece of the moon that is very old and may improve the understanding of the moon's history.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Titan offers clues to atmospheres of hazy planets

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A tree may have the answers to renewable energy

1 hour ago

Through an energy conversion process that mimics that of a tree, a University of Wisconsin-Madison materials scientist is making strides in renewable energy technologies for producing hydrogen.

Recommended for you

Titan offers clues to atmospheres of hazy planets

21 hours ago

When hazy planets pass across the face of their star, a curious thing happens. Astronomers are not able to see any changes in the range of light coming from the star and planet system.

Having fun with the equation of time

22 hours ago

If you're like us, you might've looked at a globe of the Earth in elementary school long before the days of Google Earth and wondered just what that strange looking figure eight thing on its side was.

The source of the sky's X-ray glow

Jul 27, 2014

In findings that help astrophysicists understand our corner of the galaxy, an international research team has shown that the soft X-ray glow blanketing the sky comes from both inside and outside the solar system.

User comments : 0