NASA marks five-year space milestone

Nov 02, 2005

NASA scientists will break out the thermostabalized beef tips and rehydratable apple cider Wednesday as they celebrate a major space milestone.

They'll be marking the fifth anniversary of a continuous human presence aboard the International Space Station by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and its partners, with crews living and working on the station for more than 1,825 consecutive days.

"We are at a crossroads, deciding whether we are bound to inhabit only the Earth, or if humans are to live and work far from the home planet," said Bill Shepherd, the commander of the first crew to arrive at the station Nov. 2, 2000.

"Let us continue with new explorations which are more expansive and bold; voyages which will define us as a space faring civilization," he said.

The station partnership includes NASA, the Russian Federal Space Agency, the Canadian Space Agency, the European Space Agency and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Astrophyicists draw most comprehensive map of the universe

Related Stories

Image: Reflecting on a spacecraft arrival

Apr 23, 2015

Cargo has arrived at the International Space Station to support approximately 40 of the more than 250 science and research investigations that will be performed during Expeditions 43 and 44, including numerous ...

Recommended for you

The view from up there, down here

2 hours ago

When many people saw the first stunning photos of the fragile blue marble of Earth from space, it changed their outlook of humanity. It was a singular moment in time when people around the world were watching ...

The weird ways fire behaves in space (w/ Video)

3 hours ago

Light a match on earth and you can expect the flame to shoot up in a tapering bulb. But light that match in space and you might not even recognize the small, blue orb at the tip. That's because fire behaves ...

Brian Schmidt discusses the fast-firing universe

4 hours ago

In 1998, a team led by a former Harvard graduate student shocked the astrophysics world by publishing results that said the expansion of the universe, believed to be gradually slowing, was instead accelerating.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.