IBM Unveils New Dual-Core X3 Servers

Nov 01, 2005

IBM is upgrading its X3 Architecture-based family of servers with the introduction today of new, dual-core systems based on the dual-core Intel Xeon processor 7000 sequence, formerly code named "Paxville MP." X3 Architecture-based servers are designed to support multiple generations of dual-core technology from a power, thermal and chipset standpoint.

"The x64 market segment is moving up in terms of server sophistication, reaching into the applications serving space," said Leo Suarez, vice president and business line executive, IBM xSeries product line. "IBM is uniquely positioned to deliver 64-bit solutions across a full and compatible product line and we're doing it to the delight of our customers as evidenced by IBM's number one ranking in customer satisfaction from TBR."

Available in November 2005, the new, dual-core xSeries 460 with dual-core Intel Xeon processor technology will deliver extra performance for both scale-up database serving and server consolidation projects using the industry-leading VMware ESX Server. The x460 entry configuration starts as an affordable four-processor server and easily scales up to 32-processors in an eight chassis configuration, allowing customers the flexibility to upgrade on demand to greater capacity as their business needs increase.

The xSeries 366 will also support Intel dual-core technology as a four processor server optimized for enterprise applications including business software such as IBM DB2 Universal Database, SAP, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle and server consolidation projects.

The x366 server and DB2 UDB achieved 221,017 tpmC, setting a new world record for 4-processor system performance on the TPC-C online transaction processing benchmark. The dual-core x366 delivers 46% more performance than the single-core x366.

IBM introduced the X3 Architecture to bring mainframe-inspired capabilities to the company's next-generation 64-bit Intel Xeon processor 7000 sequence-based xSeries servers. The X3 Architecture and Intel Xeon processors provide significantly higher performance than the previous generation of Intel Xeon processor-based systems, enabling businesses to simultaneously run 32-bit and 64-bit applications and more rapidly process massive amounts of data.

Source: IBM

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