Study: Live H5N1 virus vaccines effective

Sep 12, 2006

U.S. scientists say live, weakened versions of differing strains of avian flu viruses have offered protection when tested in mice and ferrets.

Researchers say their findings are encouraging because they demonstrate the ability to create a vaccine based on one particular strain of the H5N1 flu virus that could potentially protect against different emerging H5N1 flu strains.

"If an influenza pandemic were imminent or under way, we would need a vaccine that could stimulate immunity quickly, preferably with a single dose," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. "The encouraging findings of this study suggest vaccines based on live, but weakened, versions of the H5N1 avian influenza virus may quickly stimulate protective immunity.

"We are further exploring this live, attenuated vaccine strategy as one of several tools that we hope to have available in the event of an influenza pandemic," he added.

Senior investigator Dr. Kanta Subbarao and co-chief investigator Dr. Brian Murphy explain the research in the Sept. 12 issue of PLoS Medicine.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Target growth-driving cells within tumors, not fastest-proliferating cells

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scalping can raise ticket prices

49 minutes ago

Scalping gets a bad rap. For years, artists and concert promoters have stigmatized ticket resale as a practice that unfairly hurts their own sales and forces fans to pay exorbitant prices for tickets to sold-out concerts. ...

Tropical Storm Genevieve forms in Eastern Pacific

2 hours ago

The seventh tropical depression of the Eastern Pacific Ocean formed and quickly ramped up to a tropical storm named "Genevieve." NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the newborn storm ...

Recommended for you

Same cancer, different time zone

29 minutes ago

Just as no two people possess the same genetic makeup, a recent study has shown that no two single tumor cells in breast cancer patients have an identical genome.

Hong Kong makes Ebola 'contingency' measures

1 hour ago

Hong Kong said Wednesday it was quarantining all people from Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia who were showing Ebola-like symptoms on arrival in the city, as fears grow worldwide about the spread of the deadly virus.

User comments : 0