Motorola's Mobile Automated Fingerprinting System Brings the Lab to the Scene

Aug 10, 2004

Advanced Forensic Technology Enables Remote, Rapid Access to Facial Images, Fingerprints and Records

A new mobile automated fingerprinting system provides law enforcement officers and agents with access to numerous databases in real time at the incident scene. The new Motorola Mobile Automated Fingerprint Identification System (Mobile AFIS) includes advanced tools previously available only in forensics laboratories and enables public safety officials to rapidly establish the identity of an individual by providing remote access to fingerprints, facial images and criminal history records.

“Mobile AFIS allows access to information across agency and jurisdictional boundaries, which is vital in fighting terrorism and crime,” said Darrin Reilly, Motorola Communications and Electronics vice president and general manager, Biometrics Unit. “It provides the ability to get the right information to the right person at the right time. Combining radio communications, mobile applications and AFIS technology gives law enforcement professionals a powerful tool to respond to the growing concerns over safety and security worldwide.”

Mobile AFIS gives civil and law enforcement agencies rapid access to databases not only within their own organization, but to other databases such as the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) or the state’s department of motor vehicles.

“This kind of information will help police officers identify criminal subjects, criminal justice agencies respond to terrorism threats and immigration officials manage the entry and exit of visitors,” said Reilly. “Commercial enterprises such as banks and credit card companies might also use mobile fingerprinting technology in fraud prevention efforts.”

Mobile AFIS is based on Motorola’s fingerprint solution, used in 37 countries and 33 states/territories by hundreds of law enforcement agencies.

Source: Motorola

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