Motorola's Mobile Automated Fingerprinting System Brings the Lab to the Scene

Aug 10, 2004

Advanced Forensic Technology Enables Remote, Rapid Access to Facial Images, Fingerprints and Records

A new mobile automated fingerprinting system provides law enforcement officers and agents with access to numerous databases in real time at the incident scene. The new Motorola Mobile Automated Fingerprint Identification System (Mobile AFIS) includes advanced tools previously available only in forensics laboratories and enables public safety officials to rapidly establish the identity of an individual by providing remote access to fingerprints, facial images and criminal history records.

“Mobile AFIS allows access to information across agency and jurisdictional boundaries, which is vital in fighting terrorism and crime,” said Darrin Reilly, Motorola Communications and Electronics vice president and general manager, Biometrics Unit. “It provides the ability to get the right information to the right person at the right time. Combining radio communications, mobile applications and AFIS technology gives law enforcement professionals a powerful tool to respond to the growing concerns over safety and security worldwide.”

Mobile AFIS gives civil and law enforcement agencies rapid access to databases not only within their own organization, but to other databases such as the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) or the state’s department of motor vehicles.

“This kind of information will help police officers identify criminal subjects, criminal justice agencies respond to terrorism threats and immigration officials manage the entry and exit of visitors,” said Reilly. “Commercial enterprises such as banks and credit card companies might also use mobile fingerprinting technology in fraud prevention efforts.”

Mobile AFIS is based on Motorola’s fingerprint solution, used in 37 countries and 33 states/territories by hundreds of law enforcement agencies.

Source: Motorola

Explore further: Remote healthcare for an aging population

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Are the world's religions ready for ET?

7 minutes ago

In 1930, Albert Einstein was asked for his opinion about the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe. "Other beings, perhaps, but not men," he answered. Then he was asked whether science and religion ...

Blades of grass inspire advance in organic solar cells

8 minutes ago

Using a bio-mimicking analog of one of nature's most efficient light-harvesting structures, blades of grass, an international research team led by Alejandro Briseno of the University of Massachusetts Amherst ...

Study shows how chimpanzees share skills

46 minutes ago

Evidence of new behaviour being adopted and transmitted socially from one individual to another within a wild chimpanzee community is publishing on September 30 in the open access journal PLOS Biology. This i ...

How dinosaur arms turned into bird wings

46 minutes ago

Although we now appreciate that birds evolved from a branch of the dinosaur family tree, a crucial adaptation for flight has continued to puzzle evolutionary biologists. During the millions of years that elapsed, wrists went ...

Group: Wildlife populations down drastically

20 hours ago

Populations of about 3,000 species of wildlife around the world have plummeted far worse than previously thought, according to a new study by one of the world's biggest environmental groups.

Recommended for you

What's PayPal's first solo move?

1 hour ago

PayPal's impending split from long-time partner eBay Inc. will ratchet up its appeal to online retail competitors such as Amazon.com and give it the freedom to aggressively take on new mobile pay challeng ...

User comments : 0