Motorola's Mobile Automated Fingerprinting System Brings the Lab to the Scene

Aug 10, 2004

Advanced Forensic Technology Enables Remote, Rapid Access to Facial Images, Fingerprints and Records

A new mobile automated fingerprinting system provides law enforcement officers and agents with access to numerous databases in real time at the incident scene. The new Motorola Mobile Automated Fingerprint Identification System (Mobile AFIS) includes advanced tools previously available only in forensics laboratories and enables public safety officials to rapidly establish the identity of an individual by providing remote access to fingerprints, facial images and criminal history records.

“Mobile AFIS allows access to information across agency and jurisdictional boundaries, which is vital in fighting terrorism and crime,” said Darrin Reilly, Motorola Communications and Electronics vice president and general manager, Biometrics Unit. “It provides the ability to get the right information to the right person at the right time. Combining radio communications, mobile applications and AFIS technology gives law enforcement professionals a powerful tool to respond to the growing concerns over safety and security worldwide.”

Mobile AFIS gives civil and law enforcement agencies rapid access to databases not only within their own organization, but to other databases such as the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) or the state’s department of motor vehicles.

“This kind of information will help police officers identify criminal subjects, criminal justice agencies respond to terrorism threats and immigration officials manage the entry and exit of visitors,” said Reilly. “Commercial enterprises such as banks and credit card companies might also use mobile fingerprinting technology in fraud prevention efforts.”

Mobile AFIS is based on Motorola’s fingerprint solution, used in 37 countries and 33 states/territories by hundreds of law enforcement agencies.

Source: Motorola

Explore further: Twitter launches Meerkat-killer app Periscope

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Flocks of starlings ride the wave to escape

37 minutes ago

Why does it seem as if a dark band ripples through a flock of European starlings that are steering clear of a falcon or a hawk? It all lies in the birds' ability to quickly and repeatedly dip to one side to avoid being attacked. ...

Blue Freedom uses power of flowing water to charge

57 minutes ago

Good friends may decide to tell you something that is not true but nonetheless sustaining: Nothing is impossible. That was the case of Blue Freedom co-founder who asked his friend if it would be possible ...

Recommended for you

Applications of optical fibre for sensors

5 hours ago

Mikel Bravo-Acha's PhD thesis has focused on the applications of optical fibre as a sensor. In the course of his research, conducted at the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, he monitored a sensor fitted to optical fibre ...

Twitter chief vows to help Indonesia fight disasters

5 hours ago

Twitter chief Dick Costolo said Thursday the microblogging site planned to work with Indonesian authorities to warn people about natural disasters that regularly hit the archipelago, from earthquakes to volcanic ...

Virtual robotization for human limbs

5 hours ago

Recent advances in computer gaming technology allow for an increasingly immersive gaming experience. Gesture input devices, for example, synchronise a player's actions with the character on the screen. Entertainment ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.