Man spends 48 days between hearts

Sep 09, 2006

A Miami man received a second heart transplant recently after spending 48 days without a heart.

Louis Quarterman appeared with his doctor at a news conference this week. He has been in intensive care at Jackson Memorial Hospital since the operation in June, the Miami Herald reported, but Dr. Si Pham said he is now ready for a transfer to rehab.

Quarterman received a transplanted kidney at the same time.

Pham removed Quarterman's heart 48 days before the surgery because the immunosuppressive drugs he needed to take were speeding the failure of his kidneys. Until he received the transplant, machines kept Quarterman's blood circulating.

"His body went through a lot," Pham said. "He did remarkably well."

Quarterman had his first heart transplant at age 49. That heart gave out 12 years later.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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