Russian Rocket Launch With U.S. Satellite Set For December 1

Oct 31, 2005

A Proton-M carrier rocket with an American satellite on board will be launched from the Baikonur space center in Kazakhstan on December 1, Russia's Federal Space Agency said Friday, reports RIA Novosti.

Preparations for the lift-off of the Proton-M, carrying the U.S. communications satellite Worldsat-3, began at the center Friday with the assembly of the first rocket stage.

Worldsat-3, formerly referred to as ÀÌÑ-23, with its high performance and unprecedented coverage, will be available to broadcasters, cable programmers, aeronautical and maritime communications integrators, Internet service providers, mobile communications networks, government agencies, educational institutions, carriers and secure global data networks for next-generation communication and content distribution solutions.

Copyright 2005 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

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