Genetic secrets of human egg discovered

Sep 05, 2006

U.S. scientists say they have identified the genes that are unique to the human egg.

The Michigan State University researchers say the human egg's ability to transform into a new life, or into new cells that may someday save lives, is well documented. The mystery has been in the mechanics -- how a single cell can transform so nimbly.

Now the researchers say the new identification opens the way to understanding the genes' functions, which may lead to solving problems from infertility to degenerative diseases.

Jose Cibelli, MSU professor of physiology and animal science, said: "There are thousands of genes that are redundant. We found about one in 1,000 genes that are unique to the eggs -- and some of them, they don't have a known function yet. Now we can clone these genes and put them into cells and see if they may have a role in the creation of stem cells -- without fertilization or destruction of human embryos."

The study is detailed in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Survival rates higher in obese heart failure patients

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

The origin of the language of life

Dec 19, 2014

The genetic code is the universal language of life. It describes how information is encoded in the genetic material and is the same for all organisms from simple bacteria to animals to humans. However, the ...

Quest to unravel mysteries of our gene network

Dec 18, 2014

There are roughly 27,000 genes in the human body, all but a relative few of them connected through an intricate and complex network that plays a dominant role in shaping our physiological structure and functions.

Recommended for you

Survival rates higher in obese heart failure patients

10 minutes ago

Patients who were obese before developing heart failure lived longer than normal weight patients with the same condition according to a new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that e ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.