Tougher rules sought on junk food ads

Sep 05, 2006

Experts attending the International Conference on Obesity in Sydney are calling for tougher rules to prevent promotion of junk food to children.

They urged the rules be modeled on health campaigns against tobacco and infant formula marketing, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

Boyd Swinburn, a council member of the London-based International Obesity Task Force, said it is time the long-running debate on food marketing focused on protection of children, "not whether (a particular) apple pie is healthy or not," the report said.

The task force wants to come up with a set of principles that would be endorsed by the World Health Organization, and become law in member countries.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Sexual fantasies: Are you normal?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Selling and buying water rights

18 hours ago

Trying to sell or buy water rights can be a complicated exercise. First, it takes time and effort for buyers and sellers to find each other, a process that often relies on word-of-mouth, local bulletin boards, ...

Researchers create designer 'barrel' proteins

Oct 23, 2014

Proteins are long linear molecules that fold up to form well-defined 3D shapes. These 3D molecular architectures are essential for biological functions such as the elasticity of skin, the digestion of food, ...

Crowdsourced power to solve microbe mysteries

Oct 22, 2014

University of New South Wales scientists hope to unlock the secrets of millions of marine microbes from waters as far apart as Sydney's Botany Bay and the Amazon River in Brazil, with the help of an international ...

Recommended for you

Are my muscular dystrophy drugs working?

19 minutes ago

People with muscular dystrophy could one day assess the effectiveness of their medication with the help of a smartphone-linked device, a new study in mice suggests. The study used a new method to process ...

Fun and games make for better learners

4 hours ago

Four minutes of physical activity can improve behaviour in the classroom for primary school students, according to new research by Brendon Gurd.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.