Tougher rules sought on junk food ads

Sep 05, 2006

Experts attending the International Conference on Obesity in Sydney are calling for tougher rules to prevent promotion of junk food to children.

They urged the rules be modeled on health campaigns against tobacco and infant formula marketing, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

Boyd Swinburn, a council member of the London-based International Obesity Task Force, said it is time the long-running debate on food marketing focused on protection of children, "not whether (a particular) apple pie is healthy or not," the report said.

The task force wants to come up with a set of principles that would be endorsed by the World Health Organization, and become law in member countries.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: New breast cancer imaging method promising

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Uber meets local lookalikes in Asia taxi-app wars

Apr 14, 2014

Riding on its startup success and flush with fresh capital, taxi-hailing smartphone app Uber is making a big push into Asia. There's a twist, though: Instead of being the game-changing phenomena it was in ...

Bitcoin gets easier for consumers to buy, spend

Apr 11, 2014

It's getting easier for consumers to buy and spend bitcoin, the cybercurrency that has captured much of the tech world. With each passing month, entrepreneurs are rolling out new technology for consumers to buy and store ...

Japan cancels next Antarctic whaling hunt after ICJ ruling

Apr 03, 2014

Japan said Thursday it was cancelling its annual Antarctic whaling hunt for the first time in more than a quarter of a century in line with a UN court ruling that the programme was a commercial activity disguised ...

Will world court ruling end Japan's whaling? (Update)

Apr 01, 2014

Japan's whaling in the Antarctic is at a crossroads after the International Court of Justice ordered the program stopped. The court concluded the supposed scientific research program is actually a guise for ...

The promise and peril of nanotechnology

Mar 26, 2014

Scientists at Northwestern University have found a way to detect metastatic breast cancer by arranging strands of DNA into spherical shapes and using them to cover a tiny particle of gold, creating a "nano-flare" ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

More news stories

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.