Motorcycle helmet laws found effective

Aug 30, 2006

A U.S. study suggests states not requiring motorcycle riders to wear helmets may be contributing to unnecessary deaths, hospitalizations and disabilities.

"Almost 9 percent of all U.S. traffic deaths are attributed to motorcycle riding," said Dr. Jeffrey Coben, director of the Center for Rural Emergency Medicine at West Virginia University. "In 2004 more than 4,000 people were killed in motorcycle accidents -- an 89 percent increase since 1997 -- and more than 76,000 were injured."

Coben and colleagues compared motorcycle injuries in states with helmet laws with those in states with little or no helmet regulation.

They found states without universal helmet laws reported a higher number of motorcycle crash victims hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of brain injuries: 16.5 percent vs. 11.5 percent in states with mandatory use laws. The in-hospital death rate among states without mandatory helmet laws was also higher -- 11.3 percent vs. 8.8 percent.

The study appears online in the "Articles in Press" section of the journal Accident Analysis and Prevention.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: AMA examines economic impact of physicians

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

EEG helmet is being developed as interrogation device

Jul 12, 2012

(Phys.org) -- Veritas Scientific is working on an EEG helmet that carries a slideshow of images that could, they hope, reliably identify an enemy. The device is shaped like a motorcycle-helmet with metal brush ...

Head injuries increase after motorcycle helmet law repeal

Jun 12, 2008

Pennsylvania motorcyclists suffered large increases in head injury deaths and hospitalizations in the two years following the repeal of its motorcycle helmet law, according to a University of Pittsburgh study to be published ...

Richer countries have safer roads

Oct 30, 2013

Wealthier nations, whose residents own a majority of the world's vehicles, have the lowest roadway fatality rates, say University of Michigan researchers.

Motorcycle helmets reduce spine injuries after collisions

Feb 09, 2011

Motorcycle helmets, long known to dramatically reduce the number of brain injuries and deaths from crashes, appear to also be associated with a lower risk of cervical spine injury, new research from Johns Hopkins suggests.

Recommended for you

AMA examines economic impact of physicians

3 hours ago

(HealthDay)—Physicians who mainly engage in patient care contribute a total of $1.6 trillion in economic output, according to the American Medical Association (AMA)'s Economic Impact Study.

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

3 hours ago

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

How to keep your fitness goals on track

4 hours ago

(HealthDay)—The New Year's resolutions many made to get fit have stalled by now. And one expert thinks that's because many people set their goals too high.

Low tolerance for pain? The reason may be in your genes

4 hours ago

Researchers may have identified key genes linked to why some people have a higher tolerance for pain than others, according to a study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 66th Annual ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Less-schooled whites lose longevity, study finds

Barbara Gentry slowly shifts her heavy frame out of a chair and uses a walker to move the dozen feet to a chair not far from the pool table at the Buford Senior Center. Her hair is white and a cough sometimes interrupts her ...

Cancer stem cells linked to drug resistance

Most drugs used to treat lung, breast and pancreatic cancers also promote drug-resistance and ultimately spur tumor growth. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have discovered ...

Making graphene in your kitchen

Graphene has been touted as a wonder material—the world's thinnest substance, but super-strong. Now scientists say it is so easy to make you could produce some in your kitchen.