Satellites used in insurance risk modeling

Oct 27, 2005

European scientists say one of the worst disasters to hit Europe in the last decade has shown how satellite images can improve insurance risk modeling.

The three-week flooding of the Elbe River in August 2002 saw water levels reach 150-year highs across parts of Central and Eastern Europe. Numerous urban centers, including Dresden and Prague, were inundated and the resulting insurance claims were in the multimillion-euro range.

The disaster highlighted the need for enhanced river flood modeling, and the dramatic satellite images acquired during the event led to interest in the view provided by the Paris-headquartered European Space Agency's Earth Observation satellites to document flood events and better assess future flood danger.

At the end of the resulting study, re-insurance giant Swiss Re added Earth Observation products to its comprehensive catastrophe database for the first time.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Full lunar eclipse delights Americas, first of year

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

3Qs: An engineer's breakdown of a landslide

Mar 31, 2014

On March 22, a hillside collapsed near Oso, Wash., causing a 1,500-foot wide mudslide in what has been dubbed a "high-risk area" and which claimed at least two dozen lives. A mudslide, a subset of the larger ...

No national system to track landslide hazards

Mar 30, 2014

People living in the path of a deadly Washington state landslide had virtually no warning before a wall of mud, trees and other debris thundered down the mountain. Some of the homeowners didn't even know ...

Climate change likely to bring fewer big waves

Mar 10, 2014

A warmer climate is likely to result in fewer large waves along Australia's central east coast, according to Bureau of Meteorology research that predicts a decline in the frequency of storms known as East C ...

Natural disasters cost $125 bn in 2013

Jan 07, 2014

Natural disasters, led by Super Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines and flooding in Europe, cost a total of $125 billion (92 billion euros) in 2013, German reinsurance giant Munich Re estimated on Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Astronomers: 'Tilt-a-worlds' could harbor life

13 hours ago

A fluctuating tilt in a planet's orbit does not preclude the possibility of life, according to new research by astronomers at the University of Washington, Utah's Weber State University and NASA. In fact, ...

Vegetables on Mars within ten years?

19 hours ago

The soil on Mars may be suitable for cultivating food crops – this is the prognosis of a study by plant ecologist Wieger Wamelink of Wageningen UR. This would prove highly practical if we ever decide to ...

NASA Cassini images may reveal birth of a Saturn moon

20 hours ago

(Phys.org) —NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet's known ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Astronomers: 'Tilt-a-worlds' could harbor life

A fluctuating tilt in a planet's orbit does not preclude the possibility of life, according to new research by astronomers at the University of Washington, Utah's Weber State University and NASA. In fact, ...

NASA Cassini images may reveal birth of a Saturn moon

(Phys.org) —NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet's known ...

Vegetables on Mars within ten years?

The soil on Mars may be suitable for cultivating food crops – this is the prognosis of a study by plant ecologist Wieger Wamelink of Wageningen UR. This would prove highly practical if we ever decide to ...

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Tech giants look to skies to spread Internet

The shortest path to the Internet for some remote corners of the world may be through the skies. That is the message from US tech giants seeking to spread the online gospel to hard-to-reach regions.

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.