EPA: Acid rain program is effective

Oct 27, 2005

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says its 10-year-old acid rain program has significantly reduced acid deposition in the United States.

The plan was designed to reduce sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from power plants.

EPA officials call their program one of the most successful environmental programs in U.S. history.

"Skeptics of innovative market-based solutions need only look at the phenomenal results achieved by the Acid Rain Program," said EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson. "By harnessing the power of the markets, President Bush's Clear Skies legislation will create permanent, substantial reductions in soot, smog and mercury pollution, and help ensure that energy costs remain stable and affordable."

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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