It's a record summer for some turtles

Aug 21, 2006

Italian scientists say an endangered species of marine turtle -- loggerhead turtles -- are appearing along Italy's southern shores in increasing numbers.

Researchers say record numbers of loggerheads have been spotted in waters off Sicily, Calabria, Puglia and even Sardinia, the Italian news agency ANSA reported Monday.

More than 15 nesting sites have been reported, although the most important nesting grounds for loggerhead turtles in the Mediterranean are along the coasts of Turkey, Libya and Cyprus.

But the turtle's survival is increasingly under threat from aggressive fishing practices, pollution, shipping traffic and habitat degradation, particularly due to rising tourism.

Loggerheads are among the largest of marine turtles, sometimes measuring more than 4 feet in shell length and weighing up to 400 pounds.

Females lay between 40 and 190 eggs per clutch.

Major nesting grounds apart from the Mediterranean are in the Indian Ocean and the Atlantic, particularly off the coast of Florida and South Carolina, ANSA said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientists watch tagged turtles from space

Jul 16, 2014

(Phys.org) —Millions of kilometres of protected marine parks covering vast tracts of ocean may not be enough to save some of the world's migrating sea life.

Recommended for you

Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

Sep 19, 2014

Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air—and the soybeans—were still?

Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold

Sep 19, 2014

Some pollutants are more harmful in a cold climate than in a hot, because they affect the temperature sensitivity of certain organisms. Now researchers from Danish universities have demonstrated how this ...

Research helps steer mites from bees

Sep 19, 2014

A Simon Fraser University chemistry professor has found a way to sway mites from their damaging effects on bees that care and feed the all-important queen bee.

User comments : 0