Ozone-friendly chemicals lead to warming

Aug 20, 2006
Ozone-friendly chemicals lead to warming (AP)
A section of the ice sheet covering much of Greenland is seen in this Aug. 17, 2005 file photo. Scientists say the ice is thinning and blame global warming, predicting a 3-foot rise in ocean levels by the end of the century through a combination of thermal expansion of the water and melting of polar ice. When more than two dozen nations decided to fix the ozone hole over Antarctica in 1989, they had little idea that their solution -- replacing the CFCs with other chlorine-containing gases -- would also be a big contributor to global warming. (AP Photo/John McConnico, File)

(AP) -- Cool your home, warm the planet. When more than two dozen countries undertook in 1989 to fix the ozone hole over Antarctica, they began replacing chloroflourocarbons in refrigerators, air conditioners and hair spray. But they had little idea that using other gases that contain chlorine or fluorine instead also would contribute greatly to global warming.



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