New England site yields dino track

Aug 20, 2006

A worker digging up bedrock in Connecticut unearthed a three-toed, fossilized dinosaur footprint that is thought to be from a dilophosaurus.

Glenn Korner was working with an excavator in Rocky Hill when he flipped over a large rock and found the dinosaur relic, the Hartford (Conn.) Courant reported Saturday.

The dilophosaurus, literally a "two-crested lizard," was a 20-foot-long carnivorous beast that walked on two legs.

Korner was aware that dinosaurs had once roamed the area -- the 40-year-old Dinosaur State Park is just up the road from the construction site, the newspaper said.

The local Department of Public Works had warned the workers to be aware that they could come upon a track.

State officials have yet to decide what to do with the tracks

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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