Motion Detector That Also Has 'Eyes'

Aug 11, 2006
Motion Detector That Also Has 'Eyes'

A new motion detector from Siemens can not only sense the body heat of suspicious individuals — it can also see them.

The “Eyetec” system is equipped with an infrared detector that’s complemented by an optical sensor capable of recognizing motion patterns up to 15 meters away. Sophisticated algorithms are used to evaluate these patterns and determine their relative plausibility.

If an alarm is triggered, the detector archives the images so that they can later be used to trace the cause of an incident. At the International Fire and Security Exhibition and Conference (IFSEC) in Birmingham, Eyetec recently was honored with the Security Industry Award.

Developed by Siemens Building Technologies, Eyetec is the world’s only dual-principle motion detector that combines infrared and optical sensor technology. Because of this combination, the system almost eliminates the risk of false alarms. And while many conventional motion detectors only notice infrared radiation, such as that caused by body heat, the Optical Detection System (ODS) installed in Eyetec employs a CMOS sensor and fuzzy logic to also determine an object’s size, speed and direction of travel. The IRO Com Tool software allows users to set the conditions for triggering an alarm, either directly at the detector or at a PC.

This makes it possible to prevent animals from triggering the alarm, because their size doesn’t correspond to that of human beings. The detector can also be set to trigger an alarm if it senses people walking in a particular direction. This means, for example, that museum staff can monitor if visitors actually leave the exhibition rooms after it is announced that the museum is closing for the day. In addition, the user can freely define specific surveillance zones.

By marking certain areas on a live image of a monitored room, for example, the user can allow people to enter these zones without triggering the alarm. This would allow museum visitors to walk freely around exhibits positioned at various points in a room. The detector notices if anyone attempts to block or cover the sensor monitoring the room. Thanks to its anti-blocking function, the detector immediately triggers the alarm if its field of vision is blocked in any way.

Source: Siemens

Explore further: Successful read/write of digital data in fused silica glass with high recording density

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New feather findings get scientists in a flap

45 minutes ago

Scientists from the University of Southampton have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fibre, which allows the feather to bend and twist to ...

Recommended for you

Tablets, cars drive AT&T wireless gains—not phones

10 hours ago

AT&T says it gained 2 million wireless subscribers in the latest quarter, but most were from non-phone services such as tablets and Internet-connected cars. The company is facing pricing pressure from smaller rivals T-Mobile ...

Twitter looks to weave into more mobile apps

10 hours ago

Twitter on Wednesday set out to weave itself into mobile applications with a free "Fabric" platform to help developers build better programs and make more money.

Blink, point, solve an equation: Introducing PhotoMath

11 hours ago

"Ma, can I go now? My phone did my homework." PhotoMath, from the software development company MicroBlink, will make the student's phone do math homework. Just point the camera towards the mathematical expression, ...

Google unveils app for managing Gmail inboxes

11 hours ago

Google is introducing an application designed to make it easier for its Gmail users to find and manage important information that can often become buried in their inboxes.

User comments : 0