Expert: Tablet may have oldest writings

Aug 05, 2006
Expert: Tablet may have oldest writings (AP)
Bulgarian archaeologist Nikolai Ovcharov shows an almost 7,000-year old stone tablet found in Bulgaria bears carvings that might turn out to be one of the world´s oldest inscriptions, during a news conference in Bulgarian capital Sofia, Thursday, Aug. 03, 2006. The tablet, some 7-centimeter long and 8-centimeter wide (about 3 inches), carries five distinct signs each made up of two elements, Ovcharov said. (AP Photo)

(AP) -- An almost 7,000-year old stone tablet found in Bulgaria bears carvings that might turn out to be one of the world's oldest inscriptions, a prominent Bulgarian archaeologist said Thursday.



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