Better get used to killer heat waves

Jul 29, 2006
Better get used to killer heat waves (AP)
George, a two-and-a-half-year old lowland gorilla, licks his frozen treat at the Oklahoma City Zoo, in Oklahoma City, Friday, July 28, 2006. The frozen treat is part of the zoo´s enrichment program. Very hot temperatures are expected to return across Oklahoma through the weekend. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

(AP) -- In Fresno, the morgue is full of victims from a California heat wave. A combination of heat and power outages killed a dozen people in Missouri. And in parts of Europe, temperatures are hotter than in 2003 when a heat wave killed 35,000 people.



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