In Brief: Brits to block stolen cell phones faster

Jul 28, 2006

British wireless companies will move faster to deny network access to wireless phones reported stolen.

Friday's announcement is aimed both at phones that are indeed stolen and those reported stolen by their owners for the purpose of making fraudulent insurance claims.

The goal of the new campaign is to render stolen phones useless within 48 hours of being reported stolen, if not sooner. Phones will not only be blocked from their current network but from all other carrier systems as well by using the handsets' International Mobile Equipment Identity number.

The industry group Mobile Industry Crime Action Forum said the performance of the five carriers in shutting down stolen phones will be measured and published in an annual report.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: How WWI codebreakers taught your gas meter to snitch on you

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tokyo police make arrest in massive data leak case

Jul 17, 2014

Tokyo police said Thursday they had arrested an engineer for allegedly stealing massive amounts of personal data from an educational services firm, a leak that may ultimately affect more than 20 million people.

Recommended for you

Cruising high seas, engineers detect fake GPS signals

Jul 29, 2014

Cruising the Mediterranean aboard a superyacht, a Cornell professor and grad student took their Global Positioning System (GPS) research to the high seas. For four days in late June, they tested the newest ...

London mayor expected to say city will rock 5G by 2020

Jul 29, 2014

London mayor Boris Johnson this week will pledge to bring 5G to London in the next six years, reported The Telegraph on Monday. The pledge is part of a more extensive plan for London's infrastructure between ...

FX says overnight ratings becoming meaningless

Jul 24, 2014

(AP)—It's a rite nearly as old as television: the morning after a new show premieres, network executives wait impatiently for the Nielsen company's estimate of how many people watched, and rush to report ...

User comments : 0