Better ADHD screening is developed

Jul 25, 2006

U.S. researchers say they have improved screening techniques for Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder among substance users.

ADHD is a major learning disability among both children and adults and is especially common among drug users and alcoholics, increasing the severity of their addiction problems.

Although ADHD is treatable, diagnosing it among adult substance users has been difficult and expensive.

Now Charles Cleland and colleagues at the National Development and Research Institutes in New York City say they have found a screening test originally developed for the general population -- the Conners Adult ADHD Rating Scale -- also works well to identify ADHD symptoms among substance users.

Stephen Magura, the Principal Investigator of the study, says although more research is needed, the study shows improved screening of substance users for ADHD is possible.

The research is detailed in the current issue of the journal Addictive Behaviors.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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