Radiation-killed bacteria vaccine created

Jul 25, 2006

U.S. scientists say vaccines made with bacteria killed by gamma irradiation, rather than by heat or chemical inactivation, may be more effective.

Researchers supported by the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases say vaccines made from gamma-irradiated bacteria also might not need to be kept cold -- an advantage in settings where refrigerating vaccines is impractical or impossible.

In experiments with mice, scientists including Eyal Raz, Sandip Datta and Joshua Fierer of the University of California-San Diego School of Medicine demonstrated a vaccine made from irradiated Listeria monocytogenes bacteria -- unlike a vaccine made from heat-killed bacteria -- provides protection against live Listeria.

The irradiated bacteria also stimulated a protective response from immune system cells called T cells. Previously, only vaccines made from live, weakened Listeria bacteria were believed capable of eliciting a T-cell response.

A report on the research appears in the current issue of the journal Immunity.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Study supports safety of antimicrobial peptide-coated contact lenses

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

First metritis vaccine protects dairy cows

Apr 15, 2014

(Phys.org) —Cornell scientists have created the first vaccines that can prevent metritis, one of the most common cattle diseases. The infection not only harms animals and farmers' profits, but also drives ...

NASA to conduct unprecedented twin experiment

Apr 11, 2014

Consider a pair of brothers, identical twins. One gets a job as an astronaut and rockets into space. The other gets a job as an astronaut, too, but on this occasion he decides to stay home. After a year ...

Climate conditions help forecast meningitis outbreaks

Mar 18, 2014

Determining the role of climate in the spread of certain diseases can assist health officials in "forecasting" epidemics. New research on meningitis incidence in sub-Saharan Africa pinpoints wind and dust ...

A digital version of you

Mar 12, 2014

When NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity sends a photograph of the alien landscape back to Earth, it relays the information as digital data, a series of ones and zeros that computers assemble into pictures that ...

Recommended for you

New breast cancer imaging method promising

49 minutes ago

The new PAMmography method for imaging breast cancer developed by the University of Twente's MIRA research institute and the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital appears to be a promising new method that could ...

Palliation is rarely a topic in studies on advanced cancer

1 hour ago

End-of-life aspects, the corresponding terminology, and the relevance of palliation in advanced cancer are often not considered in publications on randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This is the result of an analysis by ...

Breast cancer replicates brain development process

1 hour ago

New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.

User comments : 0

More news stories

New breast cancer imaging method promising

The new PAMmography method for imaging breast cancer developed by the University of Twente's MIRA research institute and the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital appears to be a promising new method that could ...

Breast cancer replicates brain development process

New research led by a scientist at the University of York reveals that a process that forms a key element in the development of the nervous system may also play a pivotal role in the spread of breast cancer.

Research proves nanobubbles are superstable

The intense research interest in surface nanobubbles arises from their potential applications in microfluidics and the scientific challenge for controlling their fundamental physical properties. One of the ...

Using antineutrinos to monitor nuclear reactors

When monitoring nuclear reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has to rely on input given by the operators. In the future, antineutrino detectors may provide an additional option for monitoring. ...