More green PCs expected to go on sale

Jul 25, 2006

More manufacturers are producing computers that meet the Environmental Protection Agency's green standards.

The EPA reported Monday that companies including Dell and Hewlett Packard are making more products that meet the electronic products environmental assessment tool standard. EPEAT-registered computer products have "reduced levels of cadmium, lead, and mercury to better protect human health, and are easier to upgrade and recycle, in addition to meeting the government's energy star guidelines for energy efficiency," the EPA said.

"These new environmental standards can guide the manufacturing of green computers, laptops, and monitors," said James Gulliford, assistant administrator for the office of prevention, pesticides and toxic substances. "Now purchasers can factor environmental considerations into their decisions when choosing computer equipment."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Technology turns eyewear into a smart device capable of displaying visual information

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Cook farm waste into energy

Dec 17, 2014

It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph.

Nanodot team aims to charge phones in less than a minute

Nov 25, 2014

The world of smartphone users, which is a very large base indeed, is ripe for better battery solutions and an Israel-based company has an attractive solution in store, in the form of nanodot batteries that ...

International team maps 'big bang' of bird evolution

Dec 11, 2014

The genomes of modern birds tell a story of how they emerged and evolved after the mass extinction that wiped out dinosaurs and almost everything else 66 million years ago. That story is now coming to light, ...

Fungus-growing ants selectively cultivate their crops

Dec 10, 2014

Ever since agriculture evolved ca 10.000 years ago, plants have been artificially selected to become the fast growing and highly productive varieties we know today. However, humans were not the first to see ...

Recommended for you

N. Korea hit by 'continuous' Internet outages: report

27 minutes ago

North Korea appeared to have been hit by Internet outages, reports said Monday, just days after US President Barack Obama warned Washington would retaliate for a cyber attack on Sony Pictures blamed on Pyongyang.

FAA, industry launch drone safety campaign

1 hour ago

Alarmed by increasing encounters between small drones and manned aircraft, drone industry officials said Monday they are teaming up with the government and model aircraft hobbyists to launch a safety campaign.

It's down to the wire for online shopping

1 hour ago

As the holiday shopping season winds down, FedEx, UPS and online retailers are using the last few days to try to avoid the problems that occurred last year when severe winter weather and a surge in late orders ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.