New Microsemi Battery Charger Targets Phones, Cameras, PDAs, Lithium-Ion Batteries

Aug 09, 2004

-- Advanced features include compliance with USB bus specifications
-- Charging current up to 2 Amps into single cell Lithium-Ion battery
-- Requires only three external resistors

Microsemi Corp. (Nasdaq:MSCC), a leading manufacturer of high-performance analog/mixed-signal integrated circuits, has announced a new linear battery charger circuit for use in cell phones, pagers, digital cameras, GPS receivers, PDAs and low-cost single lithium-Ion cell chargers.

Designated the LX2201(TM), the new battery charger's highly integrated design requires only three external resistors, yet provides a full USB compliant charging current up to 2 Amps from a high-power miniature surface mount package only 4 millimeters square.

"We designed the LX2201 as a high-performance, cost-effective charger, with a USB limit control circuit," said Paul Bibeau, vice president and general manager of Microsemi's Integrated Products Group. "It can monitor input current supplied by the system, for example, to allocate unused power for charging. That allows faster charging without sacrificing the performance of the overall system," he said.

Other features include an internal pass element that can function as a reverse direction load switch, full capacity charging with always-cool running, a conditioning mode for deep discharge, topping charge for long periods of non-use and a highly tolerant 5 volt plus 10 percent wall supply regulation.

Designed for the 20-pin MLP surface mount package, the LX2201 is only 4 millimeters square and 1 millimeter high. Priced at $1.30 in 10K quantities, the LX2201 is available for immediate sampling and delivery.

Complete technical information is available on the Microsemi Web site, www.Microsemi.com. Samples and evaluation kits can be requested through this site, from Microsemi sales representatives, or through Microsemi's distribution channel.

About Microsemi

Microsemi is a leading designer, manufacturer and marketer of high-performance analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits and high-reliability discrete semiconductors. The company's semiconductors manage and control or regulate power, protect against transient voltage spikes and transmit, receive and amplify signals.

Microsemi's products include individual components as well as integrated circuit solutions that enhance customer designs by improving performance and reliability, battery optimization, reducing size or protecting circuits. The principal markets the company serves include implanted medical, military/aerospace and satellite, notebook computers and monitors, automotive and mobile connectivity applications.

More information may be obtained by contacting the company directly or by visiting its Web site at www.microsemi.com.

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Scientific Games strikes $3.3B deal to buy Bally

19 minutes ago

Scientific Games plans to pay about $3.3 billion to buy Bally Technologies in a deal that would combine makers of gambling equipment ranging from slot machines to instant-win lottery games.

'Wetting' a battery's appetite for renewable energy storage

21 minutes ago

Sun, wind and other renewable energy sources could make up a larger portion of the electricity America consumes if better batteries could be built to store the intermittent energy for cloudy, windless days. Now a new material ...

Recommended for you

Malaysia's Mahathir calls for Internet censorship

1 hour ago

Former Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad has called for the Internet to be censored to preserve "public morality", in what the opposition suggested Saturday was an attempt to silence government critics.

Hitchhiking robot thumbs its way across Canada

1 hour ago

A talking robot assembled from household odds and ends is hitchhiking thousands of kilometers across Canada this summer as part of a social experiment to see if those of its kind can trust humans.

Iliad founder says T-Mobile offer is 'real'

10 hours ago

French telecom upstart Iliad's founder said Friday that the company's offer for US-based T-Mobile is "real" and that he is open to working with partners on a deal.

Law changed to allow 'unlocking' cellphones

10 hours ago

President Barack Obama signed a bill into law on Friday making it legal once again to unlock a cellphone without permission from a wireless provider, so long as the service contract has expired.

Social network challenges end in tragedy

10 hours ago

Online challenges daring people to set themselves ablaze or douse themselves in ice water are racking up casualties and fueling wonder regarding idiocy in the Internet age.

User comments : 0