Study: Energy drinks won't keep you alert

Jul 21, 2006

Researchers in England say for young people caffeine is probably better than sugar if you want to stay alert.

A study conducted at Londonborough University found participants who had high-sugar, low-caffeine "energy drinks" didn't score as well on attention tests as those who consumed sugar-free drinks, WebMD reports.

"Sugar rushes" from energy drinks don't appear to be very effective in overcoming sleepiness, the Londonborough researchers found.

Their study included 10 healthy young adults who slept for only five hours before taking an attention test in which they clicked a button when a clock appeared on a computer screen.

Participants were given something to drink and then tested again.

The researchers found that attention scores began to lag among the group that had a high-sugar, low-caffeine energy drink.

While none of the participants were given a drink high in caffeine, the researchers concluded that caffeine is probably more helpful than sugar in staying alert.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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