Nebraska's popular Chimney Rock eroding

Jul 17, 2006
Nebraska's popular Chimney Rock eroding (AP)
Gordon Howard, who along with his wife, Patty, founded the Oregon Trail Wagon Train in 1976 but have since sold it, points to Chimney Rock near Bayard, Neb., Tuesday, April 25, 2006. Howard isn't bothered by talk that Chimney Rock is eroding. "As long as man is on this Earth, Chimney Rock is preserved on the quarter." (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)

(AP) -- Erosion created Chimney Rock. And erosion will likely destroy it. A long-familiar icon in Nebraska, gracing everything from license plates to decorative spoons, Chimney Rock catapulted into the national spotlight in April with its appearance on the back of the state's commemorative quarter.



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