2005 may end as the hottest year on record

Oct 13, 2005

U.S. climatologists at Columbia University in New York say international climate data indicate 2005 may become the hottest year on record.

The Goddard Institute for Space Studies climatologists said the data suggest this year will continue a 25-year trend of rising global temperatures, The Washington Post reported Thursday.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration scientists say the record-breaking global average temperature now surpasses 1998's record by a 1-10th of a degree Fahrenheit.

In light of the continuing rising temperatures, the climatologists told the Post people shouldn't be surprised at signs of global warming, such as the record shrinkage of the Arctic sea ice cover and unprecedented high ocean temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

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