2005 may end as the hottest year on record

Oct 13, 2005

U.S. climatologists at Columbia University in New York say international climate data indicate 2005 may become the hottest year on record.

The Goddard Institute for Space Studies climatologists said the data suggest this year will continue a 25-year trend of rising global temperatures, The Washington Post reported Thursday.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration scientists say the record-breaking global average temperature now surpasses 1998's record by a 1-10th of a degree Fahrenheit.

In light of the continuing rising temperatures, the climatologists told the Post people shouldn't be surprised at signs of global warming, such as the record shrinkage of the Arctic sea ice cover and unprecedented high ocean temperatures in the Gulf of Mexico.

Copyright 2005 by United Press International

Explore further: Life 'not as we know it' possible on Saturn's moon Titan

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Looking beyond the Kyoto Protocol

Feb 18, 2015

Ten years ago, on 16 February 2005, the Kyoto Protocol came into force. The aim of this international agreement was to reduce the annual emissions of greenhouse gases. Targets and expectations were high, ...

Recommended for you

Could the Milky Way become a quasar?

Feb 27, 2015

A quasar is what you get when a supermassive black hole is actively feeding on material at the core of a galaxy. The region around the black hole gets really hot and blasts out radiation that we can see billions ...

Galactic dinosaurs not extinct

Feb 27, 2015

One of the biggest mysteries in galaxy evolution is the fate of the compact massive galaxies that roamed the early Universe.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.