If you like fruit, you might love sweets

Jul 12, 2006

A U.S. study suggests people who like sweets eat more fruit than salty-snack lovers and people who love fruit eat more sweets than vegetable lovers.

"If we know a person likes one type of food, this kind of study helps us better predict what other types of foods he or she might prefer," said Brian Wansink, director of the Cornell University Food and Brand Lab.

Wansink says by better understanding how various foods are linked by preference, marketing strategies could be incorporated into an educational program to increase the consumption of fruit.

To discover how much fruit the sweet and salty-snack lovers ate, Wansink used the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Continuing Survey of Food Intakes by Individuals.

To determine whether fruit lovers eat more sweets than vegetable lovers, Wansink analyzed the results of a snack consumption survey of 770 individuals.

The entire research project appears in the August issue of the journal Appetite.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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