Freescale unveils 1st-to-market magnetic-based memory chip

Jul 10, 2006

(AP) -- Achieving a long-sought goal of the $48 billion (euro37.6 billion) memory chip industry, Freescale Semiconductor Inc. announced the commercial availability of a chip that combines traditional memory's endurance with a hard drive's ability to keep data while powered down.



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