Prostate treatment not always needed

Jul 06, 2006

A Canadian urologist says younger men diagnosed with early prostate cancer may be able to live long lives without treatment.

Doctors call it active surveillance -- watching the cancer closely for signs of progression while delaying or even avoiding the sometimes debilitating effects of treatment -- The Los Angeles Times reported.

Dr. Laurence Klotz, urology professor at the University of Toronto, has studied 500 men over the past 10 years in an attempt to shed light on who needs treatment and who will live a long, healthy life without treatment.

Men who are good candidates for waiting are those with a PSA of less than 10 and a Gleason score of less than six. Follow-up monitoring includes a PSA test every three months and periodic repeat biopsies.

About one-third of the active surveillance group has gone on to have surgery or radiation, while the rest are still waiting and still healthy. In the entire group -- those remaining on active surveillance, and those treated after waiting -- there has been a 99 percent survival rate.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Scientists discover an on/off switch for aging cells

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Agriculture the most promising market for drones

Dec 15, 2013

Idaho farmer Robert Blair isn't waiting around for federal aviation officials to work out rules for drones. He and a friend built their own, outfitting it with cameras and using it to monitor his 1,500 acres ...

The DNA thief

May 31, 2013

Evolutionarily speaking, we humans are doing pretty well. Over the last few million years, we've developed big brains, social structures and more recently, culture, cities, philosophy, airplanes and the Internet. ...

Transplant patient got AIDS from new kidney

Mar 17, 2011

(AP) -- A transplant patient contracted AIDS from the kidney of a living donor, in the first documented case of its kind in the U.S. since screening for HIV began in the mid-1980s.

Drug may slow growth of early prostate cancer

Feb 15, 2011

A new study suggests a way to help men with early, low-risk prostate cancer avoid being overtreated for a disease that in most cases will never threaten their lives. It found that a drug can slow the growth of these tumors ...

Recommended for you

Scientists discover an on/off switch for aging cells

13 hours ago

(Medical Xpress)—Scientists at the Salk Institute have discovered an on-and-off "switch" in cells that may hold the key to healthy aging. This switch points to a way to encourage healthy cells to keep dividing ...

Sierra Leone faces criticism over Ebola shutdown

14 hours ago

Sierra Leone began the second day of a 72-hour nationwide shutdown aimed at containing the spread of the deadly Ebola virus on Saturday amid criticism that the action was a poorly planned publicity stunt.

Vitamin K antagonist plus clopidogrel feasible for PCI

Sep 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—Vitamin K antagonists (VKA) combined with clopidogrel may be a better alternative to triple anticoagulant therapy in patients on long-term VKA undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) ...

Electronic health records tied to shorter time in ER

Sep 19, 2014

(HealthDay)—Length of emergency room stay for trauma patients is shorter with the use of electronic health records, according to a study published in the September issue of the Journal of Emergency Nursing.

User comments : 0