Asian Carp still thriving in U.S. river

Jul 06, 2006

Scientists had some disappointing news this week for Illinois residents: Asian carp are still thriving in the Illinois River and are not dying from a virus.

There had been speculation a virus was responsible for a large fish kill near Peoria in late May, the Springfield (Ill.) State Journal Register reported Thursday. But microbiologists this week said tests indicate the fish died when they were stressed. That caused their immune systems to fail and they were then susceptible to bacteria.

"The densities (of Asian carp) are getting very high, and that can be a source of stress," Larry Willis, a microbiologist with the fish pathology lab at the Jake Wolf Fish Hatchery near Manito, Ill., told the newspaper.

The Asian carp were brought to the United States from China more than 10 years ago to help keep fish-rearing ponds clean, but subsequently escaped during flooding in the southern United States, the State Journal Register said.

Carp are filter feeders, consuming up to 40 percent of their body weight daily in plankton, microscopic plants and animals. Some scientists speculate increasing competition for food might be causing stress in the carp population.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Pollen on birds shows feeding grounds

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Bacterium causing US catfish deaths has Asian roots

Jun 03, 2014

A bacterium causing an epidemic among catfish farms in the southeastern United States is closely related to organisms found in diseased grass carp in China, according to researchers at Auburn University in Alabama and three ...

'Judas' fish could help wipe out Asian carp

Jan 18, 2013

Methods used to eradicate feral pigs and goats in Hawaii, Australia, the Galapagos Islands and southern United States could be employed in Minnesota to fight the Asian carp invasion.

No Asian carp found yet in Ill. fish kill

Dec 03, 2009

(AP) -- No Asian carp have been spotted so far in a Chicago canal during a massive fish kill aimed at trying to keep the giant fish out of the Great Lakes.

Recommended for you

Researchers look at small RNA pathways in maize tassels

2 hours ago

Researchers at the University of Delaware and other institutions across the country have been awarded a four-year, $6.5 million National Science Foundation grant to analyze developmental events in maize anthers ...

How plant cell compartments change with cell growth

2 hours ago

A research team led by Kiminori Toyooka from the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science has developed a sophisticated microscopy technique that for the first time captures the detailed movement of ...

Plants can 'switch off' virus DNA

2 hours ago

A team of virologists and plant geneticists at Wageningen UR has demonstrated that when tomato plants contain Ty-1 resistance to the important Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), parts of the virus DNA ...

A better understanding of cell to cell communication

3 hours ago

Researchers of the ISREC Institute at the School of Life Sciences, EPFL, have deciphered the mechanism whereby some microRNAs are retained in the cell while others are secreted and delivered to neighboring ...

User comments : 0