Two Minn. residents reach North Pole on foot

Jul 03, 2006

Two Minnesota residents have become the first Arctic explorers to reach the North Pole on foot during summer.

Lonnie Dupre and Eric Larsen found open water and some drifting ice when they arrived -- no solid ice cap, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported Monday.

Funded primarily by Greenpeace International, the expedition was intended to draw public attention to the impact of global warming on the Arctic environment.

Throughout their journey Dupre and Larsen kept in touch with family and friends through daily Weblog entries.

They reached the North Pole at noon Saturday after being awakened early that morning by the sound of a polar bear outside their tent.

"It wasn't in a big hurry to leave and stopped frequently to sniff the air," the pair wrote in their blog. "The bear had followed our ski tracks into camp. It came downwind to disguise its scent and used several small drifts to hide behind as it stalked us. Then it circled slowly around the tent, coming five feet from Lonnie's head."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Africa, from a CATS point of view

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Study shows troubling rise in use of animals in experiments

2 hours ago

Despite industry claims of reduced animal use as well as federal laws and policies aimed at reducing the use of animals, the number of animals used in leading U.S. laboratories increased a staggering 73 percent from 1997 ...

NY surveying banks on cyber security defenses

4 hours ago

(AP)—New York financial regulators are considering tougher cyber security requirements for banks to mandate more complex computer sign-ins and certifications from the contractors of their cyber defenses, the state's top ...

Life-saving train design is rarely used

5 hours ago

(AP)—Nearly a decade ago, the U.S. secretary of transportation stood at the site of a horrendous commuter train crash near downtown Los Angeles and called for the adoption of a new train car design that ...

Climate change may flatten famed surfing waves

5 hours ago

On a summer day in 1885, three Hawaiian princes surfed at the mouth of the San Lorenzo River on crudely constructed boards made from coastal redwoods, bringing the sport to the North American mainland.

Recommended for you

Africa, from a CATS point of view

10 hours ago

From Saharan dust storms to icy clouds to smoke on the opposite side of the continent, the first image from NASA's newest cloud- and aerosol-measuring instrument provides a profile of the atmosphere above ...

Climate change may flatten famed surfing waves

Feb 25, 2015

On a summer day in 1885, three Hawaiian princes surfed at the mouth of the San Lorenzo River on crudely constructed boards made from coastal redwoods, bringing the sport to the North American mainland.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.