Marijuana battle moves to San Francisco

Jul 03, 2006

Controversy has erupted over plans to open a medical marijuana establishment on San Francisco's Fishermen's Wharf, the New York Times reports.

While local residents have begun to argue the Green Cross's presence at the tourist attraction will likely have a negative effect on tourism, their concerns reflect a national debate over the medical legality of the drug.

A 2005 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to criminalize medical marijuana has caused confusion throughout U.S. states such as California, which have passed Proposition 215, which legalizes the medical use of the drug.

The Green Cross is currently awaiting approval of his business permit from city officials and if granted plans to open this August, the Times said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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